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Aletta de Wal
Artist Advisor & Art Marketing Strategist

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Fabienne Bismuth
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Main | Your Art Business: Big Picture | Little Details »
Thursday
Jan262017

Show Some Love to Artists

An uncompetition to show some love to real successes and do overs.

Estimated time to read this tip: Under 1 minute.


“Each year on February 14th, many people exchange cards, candy, gifts or flowers with their special 'valentine.' The day of romance we call Valentine’s Day is named for a Christian martyr and dates back to the 5th century, but has origins in the Roman holiday Lupercalia.” history.com/topics/valentines-day

Artists are responsible for much of the art shared on this special and commercial occasion.

Real artists. And they come in all forms.

  • The artists who get up early to make art before going to work in an office and almost fall asleep by afternoon teatime. 

  • The artists who get up every day and plan to go to the studio first but life intervenes so they go later.

  • The artists who spend all their time in the studio and sometimes let the administration slide to finish a piece and but they catch up by tax time.

  • The artists who make it look easy and appealing despite all the behind the scenes stuff I just described.

  • The artists who keep on going anyway because they believe in what they are doing.

  • The artists I wrote about in ”My Real Job is Being an Artist.”

I’ve had a twenty-year love affair with working with these artists.

All the while I’ve written thousands of articles, workshops and TeleClasses about the art business.  

Besides my contributions, there’s more than enough advice online for artists.

You don’t need all of that advice and probably don’t need more information on everything to do with making and marketing your art.

You do need to find and use what’s out there that is relevant to your career – and not anyone else’s.

And despite all the information that is out there about the value of art and artists, the myths persist, even close to home.

You do many things that are unseen and not all that pleasant but that make seeing your art possible.

You create art that never exits your studio. Even the do-overs have a place in the creative and business process.

You bring talent, technique and your personal touch together to make masterpieces that make their way into someone else’s life.

Most of what you do goes unnoticed.

Let’s Show Some Love to Artists

No one else lives your life so unless you describe what it takes to be a real artist, the myths will win over the actuality.

One of my favorite artist advocates is Dan Duhrkoop from Empty Easel. I’ve written for his extensive blog and he’s responsible for the final smoothing edits of my book.

I asked Dan to join me in Show Some Love to Artists - a fest for artists to remind everyone that what we do is real work.

An uncompetition.

A celebration of the ups and downs of being a real artist.

Artists at any stage can enter: Hobbyists. Amateur. Emerging. Mid Career. Established. No fees. No rejection. Something easy and honest instead of hard and braggy.

 


 

Here’s how Show Some Love to Artists works:

  1. Send an email with any combination of text, images, audio and video using the free service wetransfer.com to Aletta@ArtistCareerTraining.com from February 14th to March 14th, 2017. Describe a real success or a do over. 
  2. Artist Career Training and Empty Easel will broadcast your submissions online at artistcareertraining.com/show-some-love-to-artists
  3. All entrants are invited to a free teleforum “My Real Job is Being an Artist: Discuss” on Wednesday, March 15th at 7 pm Est. Aletta de Wal will answer questions about your real job as an artist. 
  4. Make sure to include your contact information so we can send you the call information and a free chapter of “My Real Job is Being an Artist.” 
  5. 20 artists who ask real questions on the teleforum about what you really deal with will get a free autographed copy of the award winning book. 

  Happy 2017

 

 


 

Artist Career Training’s mission is to help you make a better living making art - and still have a life.

You don’t have to buy the book to participate in the fest. But maybe there’s an artist or art lover in your life who wants to know more about being a real artist.

Don't ignore gifts of chocolate, flowers, and paper hearts, but this book will outlast them all. And what the artist reads and uses will last even longer.

My Real Job Is Being an Artist is full of detailed information you cannot get anywhere else.

By dispelling art world myths and spelling out the realities, Aletta de Wal outlines what it really means to be a professional artist, and how to get there by taking both yourself and your artwork seriously.

These are the essentials they do not teach in art school; critical information that is more important now than ever. The world is changing, the art world is changing, economies are changing, and it is never worth giving up on your dream simply because you are lost or have been misguided.

Here is your guidebook. Find the best path to creating that life where being an artist is your day job. Alexandria Levin, Contemporary Realist (and semi-surrealist) Oil Painting at www.alexalev.com


 

Artist Career Training’s mission is to help you make a better living making art - and still have a life.

1 Wetransfer is not invovled in the fest. We just love their service that eliminates email problems with attachments.

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